©2017 BY MICHAEL AVERY. PROUDLY CREATED WITH WIX.COM

ARTICLES

Latest Work

 

VIDEO: A TWO-EDGED SWORD

Criminal Legal News, March 16, 2018

The presence of video evidence in many police misconduct cases can be very helpful to victims of police abuse. Such evidence, however, must be approached with caution.

SOVIET STORIES

February 1, 2018

In 1968, Michael Avery arrived in the Soviet Union where he would spend a year as a foreign student at the University of Moscow. In this short memoir, published in Louisiana Literature, he recounts several of his Cold War experiences.

BOOK REVIEW: BLOOD IN THE WATER: THE ATTICA PRISON UPRISING OF 1971 AND ITS LEGACY

National Lawyers Guild Review, Spring 2017

A review of Heather Ann Thompson's magnificent account of the Attica prison rebellion.

FEDERAL JUDGES OFTEN LET BAD COPS SLIDE

July 22, 2016

An Op-ed in the Baltimore Sun describing the role federal judges play in tolerating police misconduct.

CASE AGAINST NEW ORLEANS LABORER SHOWS A SECRETIVE ICE, LACKING ACCOUNTABILITY

The Lens, July 2, 2015

Immigrants live in a legal world very different from the rest of us. The police that they worry about—ICE agents—have almost unbridled powers and operate without fear of being held accountable for their actions. The case of Jose Gomez, a New Orleans laborer caught up in a sting operation, demonstrates the failure of the judicial system to protect this powerless sector of our population.

UNDERSTANDING THE SUPREME COURT ARGUMENT ON SAME-SEX MARRIAGE

Truthout, May 30, 2015

An experienced constitutional lawyer takes you into the minds of the lawyers and the justices during the oral argument on same-sex marriage in the Supreme Court. Avery cuts through the legal mumbo-jumbo to explain the problems—legal and political—that had to be overcome for justice to triumph in one of the most important cases of the last hundred years.

DO THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES AND CIVIL RIGHTS ACTS APPLY TO POLICE OPERATIONS?

Truthout, March 6, 2015

Teresa Sheehan, severely disabled by mental illness, was shot and nearly killed in her own apartment by San Francisco police officers. When her case got to the Supreme Court, the question was whether the law would protect her, or the cops.

BOSTON BOMBING TRIAL COULD CAUSE MORE TRAUMA

Boston Herald, November 28, 2014

An Op-ed describing the potential impact on victims of the government's decision to seek the death penalty in the Bostoton Marathon bombing case. Reprinted by the Death Penalty Information Center.

DON'T EXPECT A SAFE, HUMANE ORLEANS PARISH PRISON ANY TIME SOON; HERE'S WHY

The Lens, April 2, 2014

You might think that once a federal judge determines that a jail is operating unconstitutionally, that the rights of prisoners are being violated daily, that the legal battle is over and only a mop up operation remains. In fact, the battle has just begun. Avery explains how the law tied the judge’s hands in the case of the Orleans Parish Prison.

DEFINITION OF LIBERTY IS AT STAKE IN MARRIAGE EQUALITY CASES

Truthout, May 10, 2013

Before the Supreme Court recognized the right of same-sex couples to marry in Obergefell v. Hodges, legal scholars and constitutional lawyers debated what the source of such a right might be. Avery and Danielle McLaughlin explain in straightforward language what was at stake in this debate.

HOW CONSERVATIVES CAPTURED THE LAW

Chronicle of Higher Education, April 15, 2013

Avery and Danielle McLaughlin tell the story of how the Federalist Society grew from a small group of disaffected conservative law students in the early 1980’s to become the pre-eminent influence on law and legal policy by the time of the Bush presidencies.